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River Valley Pioneer Museum | Canadian, Texas

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Did you know that the first nonviolent political protest march in Washington, D.C., supported women’s suffrage? During the 1910s, American suffragists decided that they must attract the public’s attention in order to help change society’s view about women’s voting rights. These women shocked the nation when they held parades and picketed the White House in support of suffrage. On March 3, 1913, Alice Paul, a famously determined suffragist, and the National Woman’s Party organized thousands of women, most wearing white, to march down Pennsylvania Avenue in D.C. Over 500,000 people lined up to watch these ladies march. In fact, the crowd was so large that the Army’s Calvary was brought in to clear a path for the marching suffragists. This was the very first nonviolent political protest held in D.C. This suffragist march was so huge and well-attended that it upstaged President Wilson’s inauguration speech the following day. Suffragists continued to picket, protest, and speak about suffrage until President Wilson spoke to Congress about his support of guaranteeing women the right to vote in 1918. Two years later, the 19th Amendment was ratified and women were finally allowed to vote.
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Citadelle and River Valley Pioneer Museum receive Humanities Texas relief grants, but still need support

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Both the Citadelle Art Foundation and the River Valley Pioneer Museum were recipients of Humanities Texas relief grants. In late April, Humanities Texas announced over $1.1 million in relief grants for 198 Texas cultural and educational nonprofits affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Palace hosts Music on Main Street

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The Palace Theatre will be hosting local band 60 West this Saturday, August 15 at 8 pm. The band will be located in front of the theatre, so that everyone can practice social distancing while enjoying the live music. Curbside concessions will be available, including ice cream, sodas, popcorn and all the other snacks The Palace offers. There is no cost, but the band will have a tip jar set up for the community to help support the musicians.
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Modern Woodmen partners with the CCC to bring light to community resources

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The Canadian Community Center is teaming up with Modern Woodmen managing partner Landon Landry to bring livestream social events highlighting local resources. “We are partnering with these guys to give people that can’t get out as much some in-home options to stay active and have virtual activities.” Landry said.