School

In-page image(s)

A Message from Troop 271 to Canadian ISD

Body
Local Scout Troop 271 wanted to thank all of their teachers at Canadian ISD for their hard work, love and dedication they have invested in continuing to educate their students during the COVID-19 shutdown. “They sure are missing their schools and friends,” said Troop Leader Amy Dial, who created this photo montage, “and while they are busy at home doing their school work, they still found some time to jump on a virtual meeting with our Scout and Troop Masters to have some fun and talk online.” Dial said the troop chose this way to send their love from afar to all of those at Canadian ISD who keep things going. “We are blessed to have such a great community and even better school system to keep these kids moving forward and loved,” she said. “Until they are back in the classroom, they just wanted to remind their teachers they are missed and loved.” In the photo montage above are (top row) Paige Ratliff, Tylee Monty, Eli Messner, Micah Monty and Abram Flynn; and (bottom row) Cooper Savard, Conner Cowden, Eli Dial, Santiago Valenzuela, Edward Salinas and Aaron Henderson.
In-page image(s)

Plain English

Body
The new normal is still a mystery. Will the pandemic cause permanent changes in the American lifestyle? Or are masks and social distancing temporary? At this point, no one knows what life is going to look like three months or six months from now. But experts are talking. Educators, religious leaders, corporate executives, and small-business owners are preparing for the future. Here are some of the ideas leaders are kicking around.
In-page image(s)

Plain English

Body
Mitigation is my life. Or so I’m told by the experts who repeat the word over and over again at press conferences. Puzzled members of the TV audience are turning to online dictionaries when they hear words they don’t understand. When New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said the coronavirus “apex is higher than we thought,” Merriam Webster lookups of apex (highest point) spiked 4,000 percent. The same thing happened when Dr. Anthony Falci said on March 15 that Americans would have to “hunker down significantly.” Hunker down (stay in the same place) lookups soared. The words trip off the lips of politicians and epidemiologists as if everyone in the viewing audience understands the medical lingo. I decided to put together a COVID-19 glossary. Here it is ...
In-page image(s)

Some Good News—Canadian, Texas Edition

Body
When light seems hard to find, and skies seem darker than usual, it can be hard to feel hopeful. COVID-19 has slowly made its way to our doorstep, and along the way taken our plans and tossed them by the wayside. We fear the future, the unknown. We miss our friends, our jobs, and our routine. As the numbers rise, and each day lasts longer than the one before, hope seems to be further than 6 feet away.
In-page image(s)

Lipscomb boys set sail down Wolf Creek on homemade raft

Body
Homeschooling has been anything but a drag for Ben Bussard (10), and Bridger (11) and Parker Burrus (8). Longtime neighbors in Lipscomb, the boys are best friends and constant companions. Bridger and Ben were born only six months apart, and have been playing together since the sandbox. Recent school closures have allowed the boys to spend more time together, and that has resulted in some ingenious projects.
In-page image(s)

Plain English

Body
Summer in March? That’s according to mesquite trees. Mesquites are usually the last trees to put out leaves in May, signaling the end of spring and beginning of the Texas summer. Nobody here has ever seen “skeet” green up in March, but that’s what is happening. Typically West Texas has a cold snap right before Easter. Sometimes, it freezes in April. After that, native plants like lantana, hackberry, and mesquite come to life. Usually it happens like clockwork, but not this year. Timing in the year of the coronavirus pandemic is unpredictable.